Yosemite National Park

Yosemite National Park, California (United States of America)

10 Amazing Facts about Yosemite National Park, California ( United States of America)


Yosemite park is internationally known for its spectacular waterfalls, soaring monoliths (El Capitan and Half Dome might ring a bell), and overall stunning landscape, but there’s more to the present California park’s history than its naturally picturesque views.


1. IT WAS HOMING TO THE COUNTRY’S FIRST PARK GUARDIAN.


Outdoorsman and conservationist Galen Clark wasn’t the primary person to seek out Yosemite’s Mariposa Grove, but he’s thought to be the primary person to count and record the enormous sequoias there. In 1864, Lincoln transferred the longer term Yosemite park to the state of California, and two years later Clark was named the guardian of Yosemite, a task that allowed him to educate park visitors and conserve the wilderness he loved. He is buried in the Valley Cemetery is surrounded by the sequoias, he planted.


2.WHEN THE TIMING IS RIGHT, ONE OF THE PARKS WATERFALLS GLOWS.


On evenings in mid- to late February, some visitors are lucky enough to spot the glow of Horsetail Fall, shining like a ribbon of fire down the side of the cliff. The way the setting sun hits the water gives it the appearance of being aflame. For the simplest view, found out in (or just east of) the El Capitan picnic ground.


3. IT IS REVERED AS THE BIRTH PLACE OF A ROCK CLIMBING FOR SPORT.


Yosemite’s granite monoliths and challenging climbs make the park a serious attraction for rock climbers. In the years after World War II, adventurous visitors have flocked to Camp 4, a campsite in the park known for welcoming some of history’s most famous climbers while they conquered the granite walls. Both amateur and world-class athletes have trained, traded techniques, and set up shop at the grounds, which earned a spot on the National Register of Historic Places in 2003.


4. BUFFALO SOLDIERS WERE SOME OF THE PARK’S FIRST PROTECTORS.


The Buffalo Soldiers were African-American Army soldiers who in 1899 were assigned to patrol Yosemite and other protected areas in the West. The successful military regiment became some of the country’s first backcountry rangers and had several responsibilities, among them protecting Yosemite from poachers and fighting forest fires.


5. YOSEMITE’S BEST WELL-KNOWN HOTEL WAS USED AS A WARTIME HOSPITAL.


When socialites of the late 1920s rejected the primitive lodgings in the area, the idea for the Ahwahnee Hotel, a luxury hotel on park grounds, was born. Years later, it was leased by the U.S. Navy to serve as a naval hospital during World War II. The facility was originally meant for psychiatric rehab but transitioned to offering more holistic treatments for patients.

6.THERE’S COMPETITION FOR SOME OF THE MORE COMFORTABLE CAMPSITES.


Yosemite offers a select number of High Sierra campsites for those who want to backpack through the high country during the day without worrying about where to camp at night. Each camp provides meals, clean water, and access to bathrooms and canvas tents (complete with comfy beds and wood-burning stoves). You’ll have to enter a lottery system to nab one of these in-demand sites.


7. THE SODA SPRINGS CABIN IS NO PLACE TO GRAB A DRINK.


The Soda Springs Cabin is a small historic structure built in the late 19th century by John Baptiste Lembert, the first white man to settle in Yosemite’s Tuolumne Meadows. The roofless cabin protects the Soda Springs, which are named for their gaseous, bubbling nature.


8. DRIVING THROUGH ITS TREES WAS A POPULAR PASTIME.


One of Yosemite’s greatest well-known huge sequoias was the Wawona Tunnel Tree. Located in Galen Clark’s beloved Mariposa Grove, the Wawona tunnel was carved in 1881 and was a favorite photo op for tourists until a snow storm knocked the tree down in 1969. Luckily, you can still visit the aptly renamed Fallen Wawona Tunnel Tree.


9. YOSEMITE COULD ARE THE LOCATION OF WORLD-CLASS WINTER SPORTS.


Originally considered a summer destination, Yosemite became a well-liked location for winter sports within the early 20th century. The park’s improved winter activity offerings inspired Yosemite’s bid to host the 1932 Winter Olympic Games. Though the event was held in the United States, the honor went to Lake Placid, New York instead.


10. THE YOSEMITE FIREFALL WAS POPULAR, BUT IT WASN’T NATURAL.


The Yosemite Firefall began in 1872 when James McCauley, owner of the Glacier Point Hotel, first pushed a torrent of campfire embers from the top of Glacier Point. Though the tradition was stopped and restarted several times throughout nearly a century, the unique bonfire remained a popular tourist attraction until 1968, when the National Park Service officially shut it down.

FAQs


Which is the best month to go to Yosemite National Park?
Best Times to Visit Yosemite. The best times to go to Yosemite are May and September, When the park is accessible but not too crowded. It’s important to understand that a lot of roads and trails in Yosemite are closed for the bulk of the year thanks to snow.

What is Yosemite known for?
Yosemite park is best known for its waterfalls, towering granite monoliths, deep valleys and ancient giant sequoias. On October 1, 1890, Yosemite became a national park, and more than 125 years later, it’s still wowing visitor.

How expensive is a trip to Yosemite?
You should decide to spend around $104 per day on your vacation in Yosemite park, which is the average daily price supported the expenses of other visitors. Past travelers have spent, on the average, $32 on meals for at some point and $33 on local transportation.

What can you see in Yosemite National Park?

The Best Things to Do in Yosemite National Park

  • Yosemite Valley Waterfalls
  • Glacier Point Overlook
  • Giant Sequoias
  • Black Bears & Wildlife
  • Yosemite Trails
  • Go Camping
  • Rock Climbing
  • Ice Skate in Half Dome, Village.

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